Wuthering Heights Essays

Catherine and Heathcliff are part of each other, so much so that they haunt each other after death.

The followed exchange describes how Catherine is coming from the moor and wants to return home: “‘Let me in — let me in! The vision of a ghost causes Catherine to want to leave the Grange, which is sheltered from the moor, and head towards Wuthering Heights, which is surrounded by the moor.

Thus, Catherine associates the supernatural to the moor.

As a realist work, the novel’s detailed approach to the setting and characters correlates with the values of Victorian realist authors.

In addition to being a realist novel, includes elements of the traditional ghost story: ghosts, fear, and folklore.

by Emily Brontë integrates the Victorian realist tradition with the ghost story genre, creating a highly realistic portrayal of life, death, and hauntings in the English moor.

The novel presents ghosts as an aspect of reality for both the region and the characters, providing further detail into the events of the story and the social context of the novel.Lockwood and Nellie struggle to tell a story that calls into question the reliability of their own vision, yet must correlate the two perspectives in order to adhere to the standards of realism.Smajic writes that ghost story authors attempt to answer the unsettling question of when “to draw the line between objective and subjective perception in general, between optical fact and optical illusion” (Smajic 1109).This “twist” is the inclusion of a ghost story as part of the realism in the novel. In an age of realism, believing in ghosts was frowned upon by the educated upper classes; however, the supernatural was still widely believed in the lower class, especially by the lower class in .As a genre, the ghost story typically includes at least one ghost who is seen, felt, or perceived by a character, the perception of which generally inspires “dread or unease” in the character (ODLT). Nellie claims that “the country folks, if you ask them, would swear on the Bible that he walks: there are those who speak to having met him near the church, and on the moor, and even within this house,” proving that the supernatural does not just exist for the main characters — it is believed in by the lower class as well (430).Lockwood tells Heathcliff that he saw “that minx, Catherine Linton, or Earnshaw, or however she was called — she must have been a changeling — wicked little soul,” which causes Heathcliff to burst into rage, then cry alone: “Come in! When Nellie tells Lockwood that she met a boy on a “dark evening, threatening thunder” who was afraid of the ghost of Heathcliff, she dismisses his fears, saying that he “probably raised the phantoms from thinking, as he traversed the moors alone, on the nonsense he had heard his parents and companions repeat” (430).Yet, she tells him that she is uncomfortable in the house or the dark and is impatient to move back to the Grange (430).Catherine is especially hard to forget for Heathcliff, who finds himself believing that “on going out I should meet [Catherine]; when I walked on the moors I should meet her coming in” (293).Even though Catherine is dead, she is very much alive in Heathcliff’s mind, and he expects to find her in the ghostly moors at night.The moor is a haunted, creepy, unknown land: in such a setting, ghostly appearances become a natural feature of the world, not a supernatural one (Cecil 150). Later in the novel, an apparition of Hareton Earnshaw appears to Catherine, and she recalls that “my bodily eye was cheated into a momentary belief that the child lifted its face and stared straight into mine!When the ghost of Catherine first appears to Lockwood, she appears against the backdrop of the moors, just outside the window, like she had risen out of the wild land and was trying to find her way inside to safety (119). ’ I asked, struggling, meanwhile, to disengage myself. It vanished in a twinkling; but immediately I felt an irresistible yearning to be at the Heights” (203).

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